• Centre for Marine Socioecology

    CMS provides, develops and integrates multi-disciplinary research to better understand and manage Australia’s oceans

  • Centre for Marine Socioecology

    CMS provides, develops and integrates multi-disciplinary research to better understand and manage Australia’s oceans

  • Centre for Marine Socioecology

    CMS provides, develops and integrates multi-disciplinary research to better understand and manage Australia’s oceans

  • Centre for Marine Socioecology

    CMS provides, develops and integrates multi-disciplinary research to better understand and manage Australia’s oceans

The Centre for Marine Socioecology (CMS) was established to address the current and future use of our marine coasts and oceans. CMS is a unique collaboration between the University of Tasmania and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), with support from the Australian Antarctic Division.

It brings together disciplinary expertise in physics, law, economics, biology, sociology, psychology, human health, art, media, philosophy and governance. CMS uses this expertise to focus on the complex issues that are developing in the management of the marine estate.
Australia is a coastal nation with over 80% of the population living within 50 kilometers of the coast and our coasts and oceans play an important role ecologically, socially and economically. Australia has the sixth longest coastline and third largest exclusive economic zone globally and our marine regions provide valuable services through the provision of food, energy, transportation, tourism, conservation and recreation.

our Research

Further demands on coasts and oceans are expected with increasing coastal populations, food security and emerging industries such as renewable energies and offshore marine production systems. Managing these multiple uses, some with often conflicting objectives, to ensure sustainable ecosystems, industries and communities is a major challenge globally.

Events and Social

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Twitter Feed

New risk assessment for artificial habitats led by Ariane Easton, @IMASUTAS grad, published today! Open access. We hope it will assist in guiding some of the deployment decisions & safe-development frameworks. Thanks to @CMS_UTas for financial support.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195925524001471

Congratulations to ACEAS CI (and @Ant_Partnership Leader) Nathan Bindoff on his successful Laureate Fellowship, announced this afternoon.

Nathan will work on “Precision Climate Tracking of the Earth’s Response to Emission Reductions”.

All results here - https://rms.arc.gov.au/RMS/Report/Download/Report/a3f6be6e-33f7-4fb5-98a6-7526aaa184cf/263

A moving article covering what it's like to be a scientist working on coral reef bleaching. We spent over a week with author Kerrie on One Tree and she wrote this piece after our discussions. Thanks @KerrieFoxwell !

Ooof, always challenging when 1 quote get pulled out!!

I ALSO believe there has never been a better time to do more, every fraction of a degree of warming we can avoid is worth the effort. And I still wake up every morning & actively choose hope bc we have so much left to save.

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Our mission

TO PROVIDE EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH AND RESEARCH TRAINING THAT UNDERPINS THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF THE MARINE DOMAIN FOR ALL USERS AND BUILDS THE NECESSARY CAPACITY TO PROVIDE SKILLS AND SOLUTIONS FOR INDUSTRY, GOVERNMENT AND THE COMMUNITY
University of TasmaniaInstitute of Marine and Antarctic StudiesCSIRO Department of the EnvironmentGEOS
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